The Birth of the Internet

The internet, originally devised for communications in military and scientific circles, would soon give birth to a whole new mode of communication between entire groups of people for no other purposes than commerce and social interaction. It all started in the 1960s when some bright individuals realized the importance of discussion between different military operations and different scientific institutions. These people had an idea for a future where somebody could sit in one geographical location, and communicate with ease with another person in a completely different geographical location. They likewise had a vision for hampering the possible effects of an enemy strike on the nation, that if machines were unable to be connected they would not have been able to cope with simultaneously updated data in multiple hot spots.

These people worked fast. Less than a few years after the initial suggestion, a computer at MIT was connected over the regularly used telephone lines to another computer on the other side of the country in sunny California. Though the achievement was a great hallmark for these visionaries, they realized that line’s just weren’t quite good enough as they were typically used. This realization led to the development of what would soon be called the internet, ARPANet.

This development in 1969 led to the successful connection of multiple machines in the United States. This was a breakthrough for the defense department as it meant that several machines would remain operational even in the case of a nuclear strike, a great fear during the Cold War era. The system was not particularly user friendly. Today’s gamers and typical business computer users wouldn’t have been able to grasp the extensively complex system that had originally been generated – nor would it have been profitable for them to do so at the time as the cost of the learning curve simply couldn’t outweigh the actual benefits to these fields. In spite of that, these humble origins would be the basis for all that would follow – including that which we’ve taken for granted today.

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